Ask the Health Educator: Question About Plan B and Menstruation

Question from July 12, 2012:

Does plan b cause your period to be late?

Answer:

A more common side effect of taking plan B is irregular menstrual bleeding. Some women may experience spotting after taking plan B. The majority of women will have their next menstrual period at the expected time or early. When plan B is used repeatedly (more than once within a menstrual cycle, or more than occasional once-a-month use), menstrual changes may occur, including a shorter or longer cycle and a heavier or lighter period. However, if your period is over a week late, or you haven’t had a period within three weeks of taking plan B, it is possible that you are pregnant and you should come in to Teen Matters to have a pregnancy test done and to also discuss birth control options.

In good health,
The Health Educator

Ask the Health Educator: Question About When to Take a Pregnancy Test

Question from July 5, 2012:

I’m scared I might be pregnant and I don’t know if it is too soon to test. I had sex 2 weeks ago and the condom broke. And i have been having weird cramps but they are not period cramps.. so when should I test?

Answer:

Generally, a pregnancy test should be done 7 to 10 days after your missed period. Pregnancy tests are designed to tell if your body contains a hormone called hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) that is produced right after a fertilized egg attaches to the uterus. This usually happens — but not always — about six days after fertilization. If you’re pregnant, levels of hCG continue to increase rapidly, doubling every two or three days. You may choose to take an at home pregnancy test or come in to Teen Matters for a pregnancy test and also discuss birth control options.

In good health,
The Health Educator

Ask the Health Educator: Question About Early Pregnancy Symptoms

Question from June 27, 2012:

I had my period two weeks ago, but i have thrown up a lot the past day, i’ve been crying, I can’t keep any food down, my breasts are sore and I’m super exhausted. I am wondering if these could be early pregnancy symptoms.

Answer:

The symptoms that you have described can be the early signs of pregnancy. However, these signs and symptoms are not unique to pregnancy. Some can indicate that you’re getting sick or can be attributed to some other reason. Likewise, you can be pregnant without experiencing any of these signs and symptoms. The only way to know for sure if you are pregnant is with a pregnancy test. You may choose to take an at home pregnancy test or come in to Teen Matters for a pregnancy test and also discuss birth control options. No appointment is necessary – hope to see you soon!

Ask the Health Educator: Question About Birth Control Pills for Menstrual Cycle

Question from June 14, 2012:

Hello! I wanted to come to teen matters to get birth control pills for my menstrual cycle, and I wanted to know if I would be asked if I were sexually active or not. Thank you!

Answer:

As a part of the sexual health history, patients are typically asked about their sexual activity. However, all conversations and services at Teen Matters are confidential.

A lot of young people worry that we will tell their parents that they have visited Teen Matters or used our services. It is against state law for us to inform parents that you’ve visited Teen Matters or used our services unless you give us written permission.
Although parents are welcome at our clinics and we encourage parental involvement, we know that not every young person feels safe or comfortable talking to his or her parents. We always respect the privacy of our patients, and we don’t share your information with anyone without your permission.

We hope to see you in our clinic soon!

Ask the Health Educator: Question About Services

Question from June 13, 2012:

Do yall do abortions?

Answer:

Teen Matters clinics provide confidential health services for youth ages 11 to 19 in a teen-friendly environment. We have five locations in four counties (two in Athens, one in Danielsville, one in Jefferson, one in Elberton), plus a related clinic called ACES in Monroe, Georgia.

Services provided include: access to free condoms and other forms of birth control (birth control pills, Depo-Provera shot, Nuva ring, Plan B emergency contraception), testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections, HIV tests, pregnancy tests, pap smears, immunizations (including the HPV/cervical cancer prevention shot), relationship advice, nutrition and exercise advice, help with decision-making, and abstinence education.

If you have additional questions please ask. Thank you.